Massachusetts Medical Society: 2019 Award winners announced by MMS Committee on Information Technology

2019 Award winners announced by MMS Committee on Information Technology

The MMS Committee on Information Technology is proud to announce the winners of our 18th annual Information Technology in Medicine Awards. Each year, the committee extends cash awards to one resident/fellow and one student through a competitive process that starts in the fall. This year’s Resident winner Michael DiBenedetto for his project, Orthovision. Dr. DiBenedetto is currently a resident physician in Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. The student winner is Hillary Mullan for her project, Using 3D Printing to Supplement Cadaveric Dissection: Design and Manufacturing of a Model of the Female Perineum. Ms. Mullan is currently a 3rd year medical student at the University of Massachusetts.    

 

Michael DiBenedettoDr. DiBenedetto is currently a resident physician in Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.  Dr. DiBenedetto was raised in Oceanside, New York.  He completed his undergraduate degree in Biology/Molecular Genetics at Dartmouth College and medical school at New York University.  Dr. DiBenedetto is a self-taught programmer.  His first application, a Pebble Smartwatch application that timed CPR chest compressions, was named an “App of the Week” by Pebble.  During medical school, Dr. DiBenedetto co-founded a company, Ximio Medical Inc., to develop software which assists providers during a cardiac arrest.  Dr. DiBenedetto is one of the few developers working on integrating augmented reality into the operating room.  Other current projects include iPhone apps which measure range of motion, help doctors communicate in the hospital, and help surgeons communicate their post-operative preferences with patients.  Dr. DiBenedetto will be completing a fellowship in hand surgery in 2020.  


Hillary MullanHillary Mullan is currently a third-year medical student at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. As a medical student she has spent time exploring the intersection of the humanities and medicine through the creation and publication of various artworks and narrative essays. In 3D printing, she has found an opportunity to marry her passion for medicine with her interest in creativity and design. 3D-printing technology has made it possible to efficiently and inexpensively produce anatomical models. As a data file, her model of the female pelvis can be easily shared with institutions worldwide. It is her hope that the incorporation of this model into learning environments will promote a better understanding and appreciation of issues relevant to women's health.

 

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