Massachusetts Medical Society: Racial Differences in Prostate Cancer Outcomes: Promoting equity by improving access to care

Racial Differences in Prostate Cancer Outcomes: Promoting equity by improving access to care

Racial Differences in Prostate Cancer Outcomes: Promoting equity by improving access to care

Although deaths from prostate cancer have dropped substantially in recent decades among all men, Black/African American men are twice as likely as White men to die of prostate cancer and continue to have the highest prostate cancer mortality among all US population groups. It is important for treating physicians to be aware of disparities in access to prostate cancer treatment affecting vulnerable populations. This online CME course is focused on identifying and assessing prostate cancer disparities and evaluating solutions to address disparities in cancer treatment and outcomes.

 

Faculty

Quoc

 

 

 

 

Quoc-Dien Trinh, MD, FACS
Dr. Quoc-Dien Trinh is an Associate Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School, Director of Ambulatory Clinical Operations at the Division of Urological Surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Co-Director of the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Prostate Cancer Center. He is a Core Faculty and member of the Internal Advisory Board at the Center for Surgery and Public Health, a joint program of Harvard Medical School and the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Trinh’s research focuses primarily on inequity and outcomes of cancer care delivery. Dr. Trinh received his medical degree from the Université de Montréal in Montreal, Canada, where he also completed his residency training in Urology. He completed his fellowship in minimally invasive urologic oncology at the Vattikuti Urology Institute in Detroit, Michigan.

 

 

 

 

Stewart Landers, JD, MCP
Stewart Landers has been a senior consultant at JSI since 1994, focusing on HIV, substance abuse treatment, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender health, health care reform, and chronic disease. He has worked with several federal organizations including the Health Resources and Services Administration, HIV/AIDS Bureau. From 2007 to 2009, Stewart was a senior program director at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, where he oversaw a variety of programs on wellness, primary care, reproductive health, school health, and violence and injury prevention. He also developed Mass in Motion, the statewide effort to reduce overweight and obesity through exercise. Stewart is an associate editor of the American Journal of Public Health and has authored or co-authored many articles in peer-reviewed journals. He teaches evaluation of health services at the Tufts University Graduate Program in Public Health. Stewart received his BS and MA in city planning from MIT and a law degree from Harvard.

Intended Audience
Primary Care Physicians, Urologists, Oncologists

Course Objectives

  • Recognize local and national disparities in access to prostate cancer treatment;
  • Assess the different causes for prostate cancer treatment disparities;
  • Distinguish differences from disparities in cancer treatment and outcomes;
  • Evaluate solutions to address disparities in cancer treatment and outcomes.

This webinar was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Cooperative Agreement 1 NU58DP006271-01-00. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the CDC.

Course Fees
Massachusetts Medical Society (MMS) Physician Member: Free
MMS Resident/Student Member: Free
Non-Member Physician: Free
Non-Members Resident/Student: Free
Allied Health Professional/Other: Free

Format & Estimated Time to Complete
Slides and Audio (3/4 hour)  

Accreditation and Credit Information
Accreditation Statement
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the Massachusetts Medical Society and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. The Massachusetts Medical Society is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

AMA Credit Designation Statement
The Massachusetts Medical Society designates this internet enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

This activity meets the criteria for the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Medicine for risk management study.

National Commission on Certification of Physicians Assistant (NCCPA)
Physician Assistants may claim a maximum of 0.75 Category 1 credits for completing this activity. NCCPA accepts AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ from organizations accredited by ACCME or a recognized state medical society.

Exam/Assessment: A score of 70% or higher is required to receive AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™.

Activity Term
Original Release Date: September 30, 2021
Review Date (s): N/A
Termination Date: September 30, 2024

Course Developers, Reviewers & Web Producer:
Melanie Steeves, MPH, Director, Comprehensive Cancer Control Program, Massachusetts Department of Public Health
Charles A. Steiger, MD
Thelma Tatten, Web Content Production Specialist, NEJM Group Education

System Requirements
Desktops/Laptops

Windows 10
Mac OSX 10.6 higher

Most modern browsers including:
IE 11+
Firefox 18.0+
Chrome latest version
Safari 12+

Mobile/Tablet
iOS devices beginning with OS version 10 or higher (includes, iPhone, ipad and iTouch devices)


Facebook logoTwitter logoLinkedInYouTube logoInstagram

Copyright © 2021. Massachusetts Medical Society, 860 Winter Street, Waltham Woods Corporate Center, Waltham, MA 02451-1411

(781) 893-4610 | (781) 893-3800 | Member Information Hotline: (800) 322-2303 x7311