Massachusetts Medical Society: Treatment

Treatment

There are no treatments specifically for mpox (formerly monkeypox) virus infections. Because the mpox and smallpox viruses are genetically similar, antiviral drugs and vaccines developed to protect against smallpox may be used to prevent and treat mpox. The CDC has Clinical Recognition and Treatment Information for Health Care Professionals. CDC has also issued specific clinical considerations for mpox infection for people with HIV, children and adolescents, and people who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Tecovirimat (TPOXX, ST-246)

TPOXX is an antiviral medication that is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of smallpox. The FDA has not yet approved TPOXX for treatment against mpox. However, CDC holds an expanded access investigational new drug (EA-IND) protocol in partnership with FDA, and has made TPOXX available for healthcare providers to prescribe for adults, adolescents and children with severe disease or underlying medical conditions that put them at risk for severe disease or with complications from mpox. Individual risks and benefits must be considered prior to initiating TPOXX. Data are not available on the effectiveness of TPOXX in treating mpox infections in people, but studies using a variety of animal species have shown that TPOXX is effective in treating disease caused by orthopoxviruses. TPOXX is available as a pill or an injection. Health care facility access to TPOXX is coordinated by state health departments through the Strategic National Stockpile.

TPOXX resources from the CDC:

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